doctorwho:


on the bright side of moving in… i made a very Whovian choice for my wifi network.

That’s so cool!
Ours is just named something boring like.. hmm we can’t seem to find it… we can’t find the internet.

doctorwho:

on the bright side of moving in… i made a very Whovian choice for my wifi network.

That’s so cool!

Ours is just named something boring like.. hmm we can’t seem to find it… we can’t find the internet.

nprmusic:

John Grant's songs don't mess around, with lyrics that function as darts of retort and thought.
Watch John Grant play NPR’s Tiny Desk. 

nprmusic:

John Grant's songs don't mess around, with lyrics that function as darts of retort and thought.

Watch John Grant play NPR’s Tiny Desk

(via npr)

finofilipino:


50 Sombras de Gay

finofilipino:

50 Sombras de Gay

(via sapujapu)

spring-of-mathematics:

The Poincaré disk model or Poincaré ball model, also called the conformal disk model, is a model of n-dimensional hyperbolic geometry in which the points of the geometry are in an n-dimensional disk, or unit ball, and the straight lines consist of all segments of circles contained within the disk that are orthogonal to the boundary of the disk, plus all diameters of the disk. Along with the Klein model and the Poincaré half-space model, it was proposed by Eugenio Beltrami who used these models to show hyperbolic geometry was equiconsistent with Euclidean geometry.

The Poincaré hyperbolic disk is a two-dimensional space having hyperbolic geometry defined as the disk {x in R^2:|x|<1}, with hyperbolic metric ds^2=(dx^2+dy^2)/((1-x^2-y^2)^2).  The Poincaré disk is a model for hyperbolic geometry in which a line is represented as an arc of a circle whose ends are perpendicular to the disk’s boundary (and diameters are also permitted). Two arcs which do not meet correspond to parallel rays, arcs which meet orthogonally correspond to perpendicular lines, and arcs which meet on the boundary are a pair of limits rays (Figure 1, 2, 3). The illustration above shows a hyperbolic tessellation similar to M. C. Escher’s Circle Limit IV (Heaven and Hell) (Trott 1999, pp. 10 and 83). See more at Poincaré disk on YourMathsolver.

Figure 4: Poincaré ‘ball’ model view of the hyperbolic regular icosahedral honeycomb, {3,5,3}

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO! Meet the oldest living things in the world

I hope this video changes how you view a “lifetime”. Every organism you’re about to meet represents a single individual that has been alive for more than 2,000 years. Some of them have been around since before human society even existed.

This week, with the help of artist and photographer Rachel Sussman (whose photographs are collected in the amazing book The Oldest Living Things In The World), I explore some of Earth’s senior citizens. 

A 5,000 year-old pine tree. An 80,000 year-old grove of aspens. A 100,000 year-old meadow of sea grass. Even 500,000 year-old, continuously-living bacteria… how did they get so old? Why do they live so long? Can these survivors survive us? And what others might be out there?

Dip your toe into deep time, and think about this: Is every moment a lifetime? Or Is every lifetime just a moment?

Watch the video below, and if you enjoy, please share and subscribe:

(via asapscience)

Supernatural 10x1 “Black” Sneak Peek x

(via kitten-xoxo-deactivated20141012)